NIC Notes

Insights in Seniors Housing & Care

COVID-19  |  Economic Trends  |  Ideas and Discussion  |  Market Trends  |  Seniors Housing

Leadership Huddle: Brokers are Optimistic

By: NIC  |  June 07, 2020

The latest installment of NIC’s highly popular “Leadership Huddle” webinar series, titled “A Conversation with Brokers During a Pandemic,” took place Thursday, June 4. As thousands of attendees have come to expect, a panel of industry leaders provided timely insights in a lively discussion moderated by NIC Chief Economist, Beth Mace. Thursday’s discussion focused on the perspectives of the nation’s top brokerage firms on the impact of COVID-19 on their businesses.

Economic Trends  |  Seniors Housing  |  Workforce

Jobs Increase by 2.5 million in May and Jobless Rate Retreats

By: Beth Mace  |  June 05, 2020

The Labor Department reported that jobs rose by 2.5 million in May, while the jobless rate fell to 13.3%, a surprising outcome given the severity of pandemic-related lockdowns on the economy and other recent less bullish measures of economic performance. The increase in May followed a loss in jobs of 20.7 million in April, which was the largest decline in records dating back to 1939. Analysts had predicted an increase in the employment rate to 19% and a decline of 7.5 million jobs in payrolls.

COVID-19  |  Economic Trends  |  Seniors Housing

And the Beat Goes On…

By: Beth Mace  |  May 15, 2020

And the beat goes on as the new normal of living in a world of COVID-19 becomes our reality. However, the beat is not like any rhythm we have ever known. The pandemic has changed the pace of virtually every aspect of our lives and for those of us involved in caring for America’s elders who reside in seniors housing and skilled nursing properties, the challenge has been formidable, although not insurmountable.

Economic Trends  |  Seniors Housing  |  Workforce

Record Decline of 20.5 million Jobs in April, As Stay at Home Orders Cause Massive Job Losses

By: Beth Mace  |  May 08, 2020

The Labor Department reported that there were a nose-bleedingly high 20.5 million jobs lost in April as the COVID-19 pandemic closed much of the economy and triggered massive layoffs and furloughs of employees by U.S. businesses. This dwarfed the previous record high job loss of 1.96 million jobs in 1945 at the end of WWII and the 8.7 million jobs lost during the entire last recession. Employment is now at its lowest level since February 2011. April’s decline also marked the second monthly decline in jobs after a record 113 consecutive months of job gains.